Scopi.

The blog that eats like a meal.

tumblinks

search

powered by tumblr
seattle theme by parker ehret

  1. celluloidsheep:

persiflet:

did Namor just deflect the Beast with the power of his perfect abs


Yes. That is exactly what happened there. And it is one of many reasons why Namor is awesome.

If there was one thing I learned from Marvel comics, it was that radioactivity and pressure were the sources of all super powers.

    celluloidsheep:

    persiflet:

    did Namor just deflect the Beast with the power of his perfect abs

    Yes. That is exactly what happened there. And it is one of many reasons why Namor is awesome.

    If there was one thing I learned from Marvel comics, it was that radioactivity and pressure were the sources of all super powers.

    (Source: senatorcretak)

     
     
  2. fuckyeahmovieposters:

Foxy Brown

I don’t think keeping your gun there would actually hide it.

    fuckyeahmovieposters:

    Foxy Brown

    I don’t think keeping your gun there would actually hide it.

     
     
  3. brigwife:

    yes this will be the version i reblog

    because it has the first time two said it

    I love that the guy who regenerates hates change.

    (Source: finnnelson)

     
     
  4. Panel 1 - As near as I can tell this is a sighting from November 1952, but I couldn’t find any reference to the unique shape.
Panel 2 - This is a sighting from Coral Lorenzo’s book The Great Flying Saucer Hoax, though she got it from letter from Australia that was supposedly repeating a story from someone who lived in Nairobi. There is no other source.
Panel 3 - The visual here is probably the Kenneth Arnold sighting. I’m not sure why aliens would need to map our mountains at such close range.
Panel 4 - I think the reference here is to the Chiles/Whitted sighting, but I’m not sure.
(UFO Flying Saucers #1)

    Panel 1 - As near as I can tell this is a sighting from November 1952, but I couldn’t find any reference to the unique shape.

    Panel 2 - This is a sighting from Coral Lorenzo’s book The Great Flying Saucer Hoax, though she got it from letter from Australia that was supposedly repeating a story from someone who lived in Nairobi. There is no other source.

    Panel 3 - The visual here is probably the Kenneth Arnold sighting. I’m not sure why aliens would need to map our mountains at such close range.

    Panel 4 - I think the reference here is to the Chiles/Whitted sighting, but I’m not sure.

    (UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  5. The Socorro landing is a classic UFO case, and at the moment there’s a major feud in the UFO community over whether nor not this was hoax perpetrated by engineering students. The Oscar Gallegos sighting was mentioned in papers the the week after Socorro, but it gets surprisingly light coverage in the UFO press. A bit odd, because it would seem to be a better sighting than Socorro. It was closer, and some versions of the story include physical evidence.

    (From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  6. The second half of UFO Flying Saucers’ two page spread of various reported aliens. Notice anything? Yeah, three of these four are taken straight from science fiction films of the 1950s.
Upper left - The drawing is of the title character from The Man from Planet X. As to the sighting, this portrays the story of a Ellen D. Sylvester, who saw an alien messing with the landing leg of its craft.
Upper right - The drawing is a modified version of the aliens from Earth vs. The Flying Saucers. The sighting is one John Keel reports, in The True Report on Flying Saucers, as having happened in April of 1957. This being Keel, there may be no other source. The drawing doesn’t portray the most notable feature about the aliens: they were six inches tall.
Lower left - The drawing is of the Metaluna mutant from This Island Earth. The sighting is that of Ricardo Mieres in 1962, apparently from a  book by Coral Lorenzen I don’t have. 
Lower Right - The classic version of the Flatwoods Monster, as reported in 1952. While that creature was supposed to glow, I don’t remember changing color as being one of its attributes. The witnesses only saw it for seconds.

    The second half of UFO Flying Saucers’ two page spread of various reported aliens. Notice anything? Yeah, three of these four are taken straight from science fiction films of the 1950s.

    Upper left - The drawing is of the title character from The Man from Planet X. As to the sighting, this portrays the story of a Ellen D. Sylvester, who saw an alien messing with the landing leg of its craft.

    Upper right - The drawing is a modified version of the aliens from Earth vs. The Flying Saucers. The sighting is one John Keel reports, in The True Report on Flying Saucers, as having happened in April of 1957. This being Keel, there may be no other source. The drawing doesn’t portray the most notable feature about the aliens: they were six inches tall.

    Lower left - The drawing is of the Metaluna mutant from This Island Earth. The sighting is that of Ricardo Mieres in 1962, apparently from a  book by Coral Lorenzen I don’t have. 

    Lower Right - The classic version of the Flatwoods Monster, as reported in 1952. While that creature was supposed to glow, I don’t remember changing color as being one of its attributes. The witnesses only saw it for seconds.

     
     
  7. This is the first page of a two-page spread that UFO Flying Saucers #1 uses to illustrate the many kinds of aliens people were reporting up until 1968. Notice anything missing? No greys. I’ll go through these panels individually.
Upper left - The Venezuelan “hairy dwarf” flap I covered earlier in this series.
Upper right - The Kelly-Hopkinsville encounter, where a family (“natives”?) claimed to have been under siege by aliens for hours. I’ve covered it before. What’s strange here is that the aliens have been given the head of the alien from the Outer Limits episode “Keepers of the Purple Twilight.” But if that’s strange, just wait till the next page.
Bottom left - This one took me a while to figure out. There are no shortage of people in the 1950s and 1960s seeing aliens wearing coveralls, and saying the sighting was in South America doesn’t narrow it down much. The only unique detail is that the coverall was “fastened to his shoes.” I found it in the book The Great Flying Saucer Hoax, by Coral Lorenzen. It’s a report from Venancio Aires, Brazil in December of 1954.
Bottom Right - This bizarre story also comes from Lorenzen’s book, though I suspect her informant was either pulling her leg when it comes to some details or extremely credulous. Allegedly the witnesses were hypnotized, and the doctors who did so determined that the witnesses had been exposed to a “force field of considerable strength.” Um, what? If the hypnotism sessions did occur, this is probably the first time that that technique was ever used in the investigation of UFO abductions.

    This is the first page of a two-page spread that UFO Flying Saucers #1 uses to illustrate the many kinds of aliens people were reporting up until 1968. Notice anything missing? No greys. I’ll go through these panels individually.

    Upper left - The Venezuelan “hairy dwarf” flap I covered earlier in this series.

    Upper right - The Kelly-Hopkinsville encounter, where a family (“natives”?) claimed to have been under siege by aliens for hours. I’ve covered it before. What’s strange here is that the aliens have been given the head of the alien from the Outer Limits episode “Keepers of the Purple Twilight.” But if that’s strange, just wait till the next page.

    Bottom left - This one took me a while to figure out. There are no shortage of people in the 1950s and 1960s seeing aliens wearing coveralls, and saying the sighting was in South America doesn’t narrow it down much. The only unique detail is that the coverall was “fastened to his shoes.” I found it in the book The Great Flying Saucer Hoax, by Coral Lorenzen. It’s a report from Venancio Aires, Brazil in December of 1954.

    Bottom Right - This bizarre story also comes from Lorenzen’s book, though I suspect her informant was either pulling her leg when it comes to some details or extremely credulous. Allegedly the witnesses were hypnotized, and the doctors who did so determined that the witnesses had been exposed to a “force field of considerable strength.” Um, what? If the hypnotism sessions did occur, this is probably the first time that that technique was ever used in the investigation of UFO abductions.

     
     
  8. This is known as the Levelland UFO incident, and as is par for the course in this comic things are made very DRAMATIC. The Air Force thought these incidents were caused by “ball lightning” (which, I would argue, isn’t a real thing), or a freak electrical storm. The latter seems plausible to me. Reading back over the original newspaper stories, the sighting by the people in the truck sounds like a very close lightning strike. The second incident may have been the witness seeing a distant flash, then connecting it to their car stalling. Cars stall all the time, and coincidences happen. The “dozen other vehicles” seems to based on the statement of deputy, who said he was told over the phone by an unnamed person that a bunch of other cars stalled. The Air Force couldn’t find these other witnesses, so they may not have ever existed.

    (From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  9. This is usually called the Trindade Photos incident, and for whatever reason the artist here didn’t bother to reference the original photos. And the writer misidentified the island. Not UFO Flying Saucers #1’s finest moment, in terms of research.

It’s a bit difficult to say anything about the photos for sure. The photographer, as it turned out, had a bit of a reputation for fake photos, and  there are a couple parts of his story that strike me as strange. For example, he said he was alerted to the saucer by the ship’s dentist. Do research ships have dentists? I also couldn’t find any evidence that anyone bothered to talk to the people the photographer said saw the object at the same time he did. 

    This is usually called the Trindade Photos incident, and for whatever reason the artist here didn’t bother to reference the original photos. And the writer misidentified the island. Not UFO Flying Saucers #1’s finest moment, in terms of research.

    It’s a bit difficult to say anything about the photos for sure. The photographer, as it turned out, had a bit of a reputation for fake photos, and  there are a couple parts of his story that strike me as strange. For example, he said he was alerted to the saucer by the ship’s dentist. Do research ships have dentists? I also couldn’t find any evidence that anyone bothered to talk to the people the photographer said saw the object at the same time he did. 

     
     
  10. I love the idea that one of the people in this comic is like, “Here’s a spaceship from an advanced civilization that’s crossed the impassable gulf of interstellar space, it won’t be any match for our rock-based technology!”
This is another 1954 Venezuelan case covered in Frank Edwards’ Flying Saucers - Serious Business, though the comic doesn’t match many of the details. Paz was not taking a shortcut, he was in a car with friends when he needed to take a piss. It was his friends who came to his aid, not random passersby. The throwing of the rock is mentioned, but nothing is said about a shield, invisible or not.
(From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

    I love the idea that one of the people in this comic is like, “Here’s a spaceship from an advanced civilization that’s crossed the impassable gulf of interstellar space, it won’t be any match for our rock-based technology!”

    This is another 1954 Venezuelan case covered in Frank Edwards’ Flying Saucers - Serious Business, though the comic doesn’t match many of the details. Paz was not taking a shortcut, he was in a car with friends when he needed to take a piss. It was his friends who came to his aid, not random passersby. The throwing of the rock is mentioned, but nothing is said about a shield, invisible or not.

    (From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  11. Another incident in the 1954 Venezuela flying saucer flap, closely paralleling the version of the story told in Flying Saucers - Serious Business by Frank Edwards. I can’t find the original APRO report for this one, so I can’t tell how accurate Edwards was. This was a night encounter, though, and the boys didn’t claim to see the creatures that attacked them clearly.

    (There’s an extremely detailed version of this story online, but it doesn’t list any sources and doesn’t read as credible to me.)

    I do love the “final proof” — because kids never destroy stuff for no reason. And they certainly don’t come up with elaborate excuses to explain why the stuff that got destroyed wasn’t their fault.

    (From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  12. This and the next few entires are based on a flap of encounters that allegedly happened in Venezuela in late 1954. The versions depicted in the comic are most likely based on Frank Edwards’ book Flying Saucers - Serious Business, though put in chronological order — for some reason Edwards presented them in reverse order. Edwards credited APRO (Aerial Phenomenon Research Organization) as his source, though from what I can tell Edwards (or perhaps some earlier author) added/changed a bunch of details compared to the short paragraphs APRO included in their newsletters, and mixed elements between sightings. For example, the craft in this encounter was supposed to be a sphere, not a saucer.

    What I find really frustrating about the paranormal field is what a lack of curiosity most writers in the field have. They’re happy to regurgitate stories from other books, but they never do any primary research. Did these claimed encounters happen? I don’t know. I googled around a bit, and I can’t find any reference to this case that wasn’t obviously taken from Edwards’ book or someone who copied from it. I specifically looked in Spanish, and found next to nothing, just a couple photos that look like they may have been taken from a contemporary newspaper. There’s probably an interesting story here, but 50 years later it’s been lost.

    (From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  13. On September 10, 1954 Marius Dewilde claimed to have an encounter with occupants of a strange craft that landed on nearby train tracks.

    The comic book version gets some important bits wrong compared to Dewilde’s account. He said the creatures were short, and they didn’t have arms as far as he could see. They were also wearing diving suits and helmets that kept him from seeing their faces. The marks on train tracks were not nearly as dramatic as shown here. In fact, we have a picture of them, and Marius himself.

    What can we tell from this picture? First, that Marius was the most French Frenchman who ever lived. Second, the marks on the tie could be anything. Even with them circled, it’s tough to see them. Thirdly, the next train that had to use those tracks was going to be in a lot of trouble.

    But what about the “deep impression” and “crumbling ballast”? They simply didn’t exist. Those details are exaggerations from UFO books in the 1960s. The “impression” seems to be the wishful thinking version of those four tiny marks on the tie, and the ballast story came from one police reference to the ballast at the tracks being “exposed” (ie. disturbed), which later writers turned into “exposed to high heat.”

    The police interviewed Dewilde, and came to conclusion he wasn’t lying, but did note that he had had a “cranial trauma” a year earlier. I think it’s fairly safe to say that the whole thing was a dream Dewilde had. Even in his own account he mentions that after he was paralyzed he felt like he was dreaming.

    Worth noting, Dewilde wasn’t the only French person who said he encountered an alien that night. Antoine Mazaud would later claim he was confronted by a strange small man in a helmet, who he threatened with a pitchfork. The small man responded by kissing him. For some reason UFOlogists don’t talk about this sighting very much.

    (From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  14. The participants in Operation Mainbrace really did report seeing unknown objects in the sky, though this account compresses a bunch of sightings into two days. Also, there was little agreement on what the objects looked like: spheres were mentioned, but so were disks and even triangles. The description of one of the objects “swinging like a pendulum” comes straight from a witness statement, and I’ve always wonder what that meant in the context of an object flying in the sky.

    (From UFO Flying Saucers #1)

     
     
  15. More speculation on life from UFO Flying Saucers #1. The guys with the ears, I feel like I’ve seen them somewhere else but I can’t place where.

    More speculation on life from UFO Flying Saucers #1. The guys with the ears, I feel like I’ve seen them somewhere else but I can’t place where.